Brain Plasticity in Autism- new approaches from Yale University

Brain Plasticity in Autism- new approaches from Yale University

All brains are able to change by forming new neural connections. This ability to change is known neuroplasticity or brain plasticity. The capacity of the brain to, under the right circumstances, re-organize itself physically and functionally underpins trans-cranial Direct Current stimulation (tDCS) as a treatment modality. Harry D. Schneider PhD, MD, MPH, Consultant in Neurolinguistics to the Joy Hirsch PhD, Director of Brain Function Laboratory, Yale University School of Medicine, will share his decades of research and clinical experience of tDCS…

Autism and auditory processing

Autism and auditory processing

Autism and auditory processing The impact of auditory processing issues in autism It is well understood that many on the autism spectrum experience challenges with processing a range of sensory information. This is wonderfully covered in previous Thinking Autism blogs...
Synchrony 2019 – Translational Research in Autism symposia

Synchrony 2019 – Translational Research in Autism symposia

The first Brain Foundation annual symposia, Pleasanton, California 8-10 of Nov 2019, aimed to connect researchers with clinicians, donors & stake holders to help translate research efforts into evidence-based treatments for autism and its co-morbidities. It highlighted the need for multidisciplinary collaboration, detailed diagnostics and personalised treatment…

Transcranial direct current stimulation tDCS – a novel treatment for autism?

Transcranial direct current stimulation tDCS – a novel treatment for autism?

One of the treatment modalities that has shown the greatest promise for reducing symptoms of autism in recent years is transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). The most recent study confirmed and expanded on the findings of previous investigations, which strongly indicate that tDCS could have positive effects on cognition, behaviour and physical health, and improve quality of life and autonomy for a large percentage of individuals with autism.

Misperceptions of ASD Neurodiversity and Health Recovery

Misperceptions of ASD Neurodiversity and Health Recovery

As a Chartered Psychologist, child development researcher and author in the autism/ASD field, I frequently meet misperceptions of neurodiversity in relation to programmes for autism and health recovery. Somehow or other the belief has developed that to offer such help to an individual on the autistic spectrum is to deny their neurodiversity. In this blog I suggest a new way of looking at this subject…